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Pyjamas Protest Decries Trump’s ‘Family Separation’ Policy in Washington DC

Thousands of childrens’ pajamas were hung in Washington DC National Mall on Sunday, to bring awareness to the issue of family separation at the US-Mexico border. 

Maryland activists hung the pyjamas in front of the US Capitol to oppose the ill-treatment of families at the border and demand a comprehensive immigration reform.

Under the title “Where are the children?” the project was put forth by a high school student from Colombia, Maryland Alex Cohen who raised the issue with his Unitarian Universalist Congregation.

“I was at first just in shock, I was just amazed that they would do something like this, and that this is like really happening,” said Cohen who added that he wanted a collective push for the Congress action in opposing the policy.

A member of Immigration Action Team Tammy Spangler also condemned the family separation policy for traumatizing both the children and the families and added that the detention facilities were profiting from the practice.

The 2018 immigration policy which entailed separating children from their parents as the parents awaited trial, caused intense criticism both within the country and abroad. US President Donald Trump eventually signed an executive order allowing children to remain with their parents as they wait for trial.



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